Daya Bay nuclear power plant is the first of its kind in Mainland China. It is one of the earliest and largest joint-venture projects launched under the Open-Door Policy, and has remained one of the most successful projects. CLP owns 25% shares of the nuclear power station.

Daya Bay is located in Dapeng, a sub-district of Shenzhen in Guangdong Province. This site was evaluated as a suitable place to build a nuclear power station and is convenient in providing electricity to Hong Kong.

The station comprises two pressurised water reactor (PWR) generating units, and the gross capacity is 1,968 MW. Over the years, additional nuclear machines have been built near the nuclear power station respectively, though these machines are not part of CLP’s joint projects. The station produces some 14 billion kWh of electricity per year, of which a portion is currently imported by CLP into its system in Hong Kong. In 2009, the supply contract was extended until 2034.


Nuclear power is safe and stable. It basically will not release any residue or carbon emission. We believe sustainable development of our nuclear projects will be one of our measures to ease the global climate change.

The nuclear power station has earned a good reputation in the management, operation and safety behaviour aspect in the ‘World Association of Nuclear Operator”, an organisation of industry leaders. The station has also received many awards in competitions organised by the French electricity company.


  • Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station


  • Daya Bay, Guangdong, China


  • Guangdong Nuclear Power Joint Venture Company, Limited

Equity Interest

  • CLP - 25%
  • Guangdong Nuclear Investment Company, Ltd. – 75%

Generation Type

  • Nuclear

Gross Capacity

  • 1,968MW (2 x 984MW)

CLP Equity Capacity

  • 492MW

Capacity purchase

  • At least 1,378MW

Year of Commissioning

  • 1994

Project Highlights

  • Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR)
  • First commercial nuclear power station in China
  • Excellent safety and operational record
  • Non-carbon source of electricity


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