1. Does the electromagnetic field (EMF) produced by induction cookers pose a safety hazard?
  2. When an induction cooker is in operation, will the EMF be conducted through the bracelets or rings that I am wearing?
  3. Children are curious. If they touch the switch of the induction cooker, will this pose higher potential of home accidents?
  4. The flat design of the induction cooker has greatly increased the space of my kitchen worktop. However, will condiments, tinned foods or kitchen implements placed on top of the cooker be heated up?
  5. Induction cooker heats up instantly and powerfully, will the cooker top become overheated? Is it very dangerous if it comes into contact with any part of the body or plastic bags?
  6. If cooking utensils becomes out of shape because of wear and tear. Will this affect the heat detection function of induction cookers?
  7. Only metallic cooking utensils are suitable for induction cooking. Does this mean a restriction in the cooking methods? What if I wanted to use a clay pot?
  8. There have been concerns about the induction cooker not being able to distribute heat evenly. Will this result in a loss of food nutrients and flavours?
  9. Will the long-term effects of pressure and heat cause the glass top of the induction cooker to crack?
  10. Is the typical household voltage of 220V sufficient for an induction cooker?
  11. Will CLP persuade Government and Property Developers to provide for electric and gas appliances for owners/tenants to choose?

1. Does the electromagnetic field (EMF) produced by induction cookers pose a safety hazard?

No. The electromagnetic strength of the induction cooker has been well tested and found to be far lower than the safety limit for EMF exposure as recommended by international standard, EN50366 for instance. In Hong Kong, all induction cookers are required to comply with Hong Kong Product (Safety) Regulation and are as safe as any other type of electrical appliances.

2. When an induction cooker is in operation, will the EMF be conducted through the bracelets or rings that I am wearing?

Of course not! Only a ferromagnetic base utensils with 8 cm or above in diameter can become electromagnetically conductive if placed at the centre of the cooking zone. So you can do your cooking over an induction cooker with your jewellery on.

3. Children are curious. If they touch the switch of the induction cooker, will this pose higher potential of home accidents?

In the first place, children should only go in and out of the kitchen accompanied by their parents. But even if the kids are around, the chances of turning on the cooker by accident are slim – not just because of the safety lock that is found on most induction cooker models, but also because it requires turning on two switches to activate the cooker.

4. The flat design of the induction cooker has greatly increased the space of my kitchen worktop. However, will condiments, tinned foods or kitchen implements placed on top of the cooker be heated up?

No. Non-magnetic-conducting materials and any metallic substance measuring less than 8 cm in diameter will not conduct heat. However, if users are still concerned about safety, we suggest that they switch off the electrical power or activate the safety lock when the cooker is not in use.

5. Induction cooker heats up instantly and powerfully, will the cooker top become overheated? Is it very dangerous if it comes into contact with any part of the body or plastic bags?

The cooker top does not emit heat on its surface so its temperature isn't high. The residual heat from the cookware will not be strong enough to cause skin burns or melt plastic bags. In fact, the cooker top dissipates heat at great speed, and you can often wipe it clean with a damp cloth after cooking. It is that convenient!

6. If cooking utensils becomes out of shape because of wear and tear. Will this affect the heat detection function of induction cookers?

No. Even if the bottom of your cooking utensils is slightly dented, the induction cooker's heat sensing capability will stay intact. Moreover, thanks to a duplicate safety design for all standard induction cookers, even if the basic sensor fails to function, the cooker can continue to operate using its backup sensor.

7. Only metallic cooking utensils are suitable for induction cooking. Does this mean a restriction in the cooking methods? What if I wanted to use a clay pot?

Currently there are many different types of cooking utensils that can be used for induction cooking, including clay pots. Kitchenware manufacturers launch a lot of new products designed for induction cooking recently. So, all your cooking whims can easily be satisfied by the induction cooker.

8. There have been concerns about the induction cooker not being able to distribute heat evenly. Will this result in a loss of food nutrients and flavours?

Of course not. The induction cooker produces and transmits heat by means of induction and distributes the heat evenly around the bottom of the cooking utensils. In fact, it's traditional cookers that cannot distribute heat evenly, thus easily taking away the moisture content and flavours of foods. What's more, energy is wasted.

9. Will the long-term effects of pressure and heat cause the glass top of the induction cooker to crack?

Don't worry. The induction cooker's surface is a heat and pressure-resistant "ceramic", which does not crack easily even under high temperature and pressure.

10. Is the typical household voltage of 220V sufficient for an induction cooker?

That's more than sufficient. With heat efficiency as high as 90% and the "Shift-power" function designed according to the cooking habits of Hong Kong people, you can boil soup and stir-fry at the same time. An induction cooker is sufficient for all cooking purposes for a typical family.

11. Will CLP persuade Government and Property Developers to provide for electric and gas appliances for owners/tenants to choose?

For new public housing estates, CLP has successfully persuaded the Government (Housing Department) to install a power socket at the cooking bench in the kitchen, so that the tenants can choose to use electric (no-flame) cooking. For private residential properties, CLP is promoting dual-fuel (i.e. electric and gas) cooking appliances, in addition to pure electric cooking to the developers, and CLP already has many successful cases.

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